The Raptor’s high-performance package is way above its competitors

Quick notes

  • Raptor’s Engine puts out 450 horsepower and 510 foot-pounds of torque

  • Ford’s Terrain Management Systems lets you choose a mode to match the road

  • The Raptor comes with Fox racing shocks that can “talk” to your truck

If you’re an off-roader, you get pretty excited about all the bells and whistles you can get on a rig. The new Raptor delivers those bells and whistles and then some. Ford has a new feature called the Terrain Management System. It’s what sets the Raptor apart from its competitors.

Terrain Management System

This system has some amazing off-roading features. The best one is the ability to switch between different modes on the fly while out on your adventures. You can choose between rock crawling – which is super fun – mud/sand traction, wet/snow, sport mode, normal, or Baja mode. The truck then makes adjustments to match whatever type of off-roading you’re doing. 

Baja mode refers to the Baja 1000 race held down in Mexico every year. According to Ford, Baja mode, or beast mode, is designed for “high-speed desert running” with quick shifts and a tranny that holds the gears longer. Ford has tested its trucks during this race in near-stock form.

Raptor’s powertrain, the belly of the beast

When off-roading, power is essential. Getting stuck and needing a tow really sucks. The Raptor is equipped with an impressive, high-performance engine that kicks out 450 horsepower at 5000 rpm. It’s a 3.5-liter EcoBoost engine with twin-turbos, DOHC 24-valve and 10-speed automatic tranny with a hefty 510 ft.-lbs of torque.

The Raptor’s 10-speed tranny is also superior to Chevy’s 8-speed. That can make a big difference when off-roading. Those last two gears can mean the difference between getting stuck in the rocks or crawling over them.

Photo Courtesy: [Alexander Migl/Wikimedia Commons]

The Raptor does have some competitors out there. But are the engines comparable? Not really. The Raptor’s beefy engine beats out the Chevy Colorado every time. Chevy’s V6 3.5-liter engine puts out 305 horsepower, compared to the Raptor’s 450 HP. That can make a difference as to whether or not you crest that muddy hill. Nothing worse than sliding backwards all the way to the bottom. How embarrassing!

According to Autotrader, The Ford Raptor is the fastest off-road pickup truck available. It’s rated from zero to 60 mph in 5.3 seconds. That is definitely ahead of its competitors.

…the fastest off-road pickup truck available

Then there’s the all-important suspension and wheel-base

If off-roading is one of your favorite past times, you know all too well how important suspension is. Rolling the truck over a few times is never good. You don’t necessarily want parts flying off while out on your adventures. So Raptor has you covered in that department too.

First off, the Raptor is much lighter than other trucks in its class due to its aluminum-alloy body. Even though it’s aluminum, it’s military-grade aluminum which can withstand just about any off-roading imaginable.

It comes stock with the toughest suspension out there. One big reason is the Fox racing shocks. Ford calls them “live shocks” because there is active communication between the truck and the shocks.

That’s right. This new electrical component gauges the suspension and makes the necessary adjustments on the fly to give the best drivability the truck can offer. That’s some incredible technology. Ford states the suspension will hold up even if the truck goes airborne. Yikes!

“You can choose between rock crawling –  which is super fun – mud/sand traction, wet/snow, sport mode, normal, or Baja mode.”

So to wrap it all up, Raptor is more than ready to handle just about any off-roading trip you can think of. All of the above features also make it a better everyday truck. It has even been called a trophy truck by some off-road aficionados. All of this doesn’t come cheap. The Ford Raptor starts at $54,450. But with all of the goodies, many off-roaders are more than happy to fork over their hard-earned dollars.

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